Can computers help unlock the mysteries of the brain?

This story was originally published by Sean O’Malley, Senior Media Relations Specialist and co-host of the CAMH Podcast, on the CAMH website

There is perhaps no better way to illustrate how much the world of mental health research has changed in the 20-year history of CAMH than to look at the work being done today by Dr. Sean Hill’s team at the Krembil Centre for Neuroinformatics.

Consider what happened in 1997, the year before CAMH was created. That was when Deep Blue, a supercomputer created by IBM, defeated the world’s best chess player Gary Kasparov, marking a seminal event in the history of our relationship with technology. Today, the free chess app on my smart phone could probably beat Deep Blue.

For fans of the dystopian Terminator movie franchise, Deep Blue’s victory over Team Human signaled the beginning of the end for humanity as we know it.

But for young scientists like Dr. Hill, it raised the same question he had been asking since he tried his first PC at the age of eight: how much smarter could we make these machines? Could we make them smart enough to unlock the mysteries of the brains of the people who created them?

CAMH podcast with Dr. Sean Hill neuroinformatics
Dr. Sean Hill, Director of CAMH’s Krembil Centre for Neuroinformatics and CAMH podcast co-hosts Dr. David Goldbloom and Sean O’Malley discuss the past, present and future of neuroinformatics.

Yes, Dr. Hill began coding when he was eight, inspired by something called a TRS-80 that his older brother’s high school had purchased at a local Radio Shack and let his brother bring home to their family farm in rural Maine.

“In the winter when it was cold and dark…there was this whole new world you could discover in a box,” says Hill. “To me it was an opportunity to be incredibly creative.”

From a neuroscience perspective, the answer to 8-year-old Sean Hill’s question about computers and the brain increasingly appears to be ‘yes’ in a way we could only have imagined in CAMH’s early days. And that could have profound implications for how we diagnose and treat mental illness in the future.

“We saw in 2005 that by 2025, a supercomputer would be built that could simulate brain circuitry the scale of the human brain,” says Dr. Hill in the latest episode of the CAMH Podcast.

That prediction ended up being off but not by much – that supercomputer is now expected to be ready in the next two years.

Just in time for Dr. Hill to apply that technology breakthrough to his work at CAMH.

After devoting much of his career to this intersection between computers and neuroscience, most recently at the prestigious Blue Brain Project in Switzerland, what most excites Dr. Hill about coming to CAMH is that he can now apply the theoretical power of big data to the flesh and blood world of patient care.

 

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Sinai Health System is one of Ontario’s 23 research hospitals that contribute to a healthier, wealthier, smarter province. Look for other RESEARCH SPOTLIGHT posts on our Healthier, Wealthier, Smarter blog or join the conversation about why health research matters for Ontario on Twitter, using the hashtag #onHWS.

Healthy Aging: 100 Years of Research and Care at Baycrest

“I just plough through, that’s something I learned from my mom. Just plough through,” says Barbara Schechter, a young caregiver featured in CBC’s recent documentary, The Caregivers Club, which takes an intimate and compassionate look at the lives of four caregivers and their loved ones living with dementia. The families are also part of the Baycrest Health Sciences community in Toronto.

With three young children and a full time job, Barbara is also a caregiver for her mother. “The only thing that gets you through the day is how you’re going to manage and how you’re going to make your mom safe,” says Barbara in the documentary.

There are currently 564,000 Canadians living with dementia, and that number is expected to double by 2031. As Canada’s population ages, more and better care is needed.

Baycrest Health SciencesThat’s what drives the researchers at Baycrest Health Sciences.

Baycrest is ranked as one of the most research-intensive hospitals in Canada and is a member of the Council of Academic Hospitals of Ontario, which represents Ontario’s research hospitals. Research hospitals play a unique and vital role in Ontario’s health system, providing advanced patient care services, training the healthcare workforce, and conducting leading-edge research to discover tomorrow’s care today. They generate the expertise and evidence to drive change as system leaders, building a healthier, wealthier, smarter Ontario.

And Baycrest is doing just that. Its Rotman Research Institute is among the world’s top research institutes in cognitive neuroscience.  The Centre for Aging and Brain Health Innovation, led by Baycrest Health Sciences, helps to accelerate brain health and aging solutions. Together, Baycrest is advancing dementia care for patients locally and globally, discovering better ways to diagnose, prevent and treat dementia and other brain disorders.

Research at Baycrest is part of a continuous cycle, where foundational brain research leads to clinical testing, which leads to innovations supporting healthy aging, which leads to more questions about the fundamental mechanisms of the brain.

Is my memory normal? At-home assessments and iPad apps  

Early detection and prevention of memory problems and cognitive impairment is a major area of focus at Baycrest. Cogniciti, a digital health company led by Baycrest researchers, is empowering adults to assess their memory in the comfort of their own homes. Free, private and clinically researched, the digital brain health assessment has helped more than 60,000 adults answer the question, “Is my memory normal or should I see my doctor?”

Test-takers age 40 and up solve a series of evidence-based puzzles, including shape matching, face and name matching, and a number-letter alternating test. Based on performance, they receive a memory report and may be advised to connect with their family doctor for next steps in care.  Through the brain health assessment, Cogniciti provides researchers access to a rich pool of interested volunteers to help advance memory research.

Another initiative accelerating research into Alzheimer’s and dementia treatments is Baycrest’s work with the Toronto Dementia Research Alliance (TDRA). The Sam and Ida Ross Memory Clinic at Baycrest is the initial pilot site for the newly developed Toronto Cognitive Assessment (TorCA), which utilizes an iPad to capture anonymous patient information and pools it onto a secure, research recruitment database that will be shared amongst TDRA memory clinics. This data will allow scientists to widen their pool of research subjects and easily identify and recruit consenting subjects who match the criteria for their dementia studies.

The TorCA is a sensitive tool that can identify patients at risk of dementia earlier. The assessment not only informs research on detection of memory-related conditions, it also saves costs for the health system and saves patients from having to pursue unnecessary cognitive tests.

Currently, Ontario patients concerned with cognitive impairment receive assessments from specialists. The TorCA iPad app is a game changer, allowing any health care professional to assess patients upfront and determine whether they need to pursue a more lengthy and resource intensive neuropsychology exam. The hope is that this tool will soon be clinically available across TDRA hospital sites within Toronto – and beyond— free of charge.

Getting a glimpse into a brain with dementia

What if you could detect the minute changes that occur in the brain Alzheimer's transcranial stimulationover the course of a person’s life? Researchers at Baycrest are getting the chance to do just that by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to study the aging brain, including brains with very early dementia.

Cognitive tests, similar to the Toronto Cognitive Assessment, led Dr. Rosanna Olsen and her team to wonder whether physical differences could be detected in the brains of healthy adults who scored poorly compared to those who scored well.

Her cross-sectional study found that people who scored lower on cognitive tests had a smaller “memory region” of the brain – the same region that is first affected in Alzheimer’s disease. This finding has allowed researchers to use both memory region brain measures and low cognitive test scores as biomarkers (a biological flag) for Alzheimer’s disease, which is a big step forward for the detection and prevention of dementia.

Innovative treatment for older adults with depression and Alzheimer’s disease

Up to 70% of people living with Alzheimer’s disease also suffer from depression, which does not typically respond to standard antidepressant treatments. Dr. Linda Mah and Dr. Jed Meltzer are using a non-invasive procedure called transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to reduce symptoms of depression in older adults with Alzheimer’s.

TMS uses magnetic fields to stimulate or inhibit neurons in the brain. Although TMS is approved as a treatment for depression, researchers are aiming to treat other neurologic and psychiatric conditions. Drs. Mah and Meltzer will evaluate the effects of TMS on both mood and memory in Alzheimer’s patients who also suffer from clinical depression. For Alzheimer’s patients, this could mean tapping into brain stimulation to treat their symptoms.

Patient and family care driving research

Research at Baycrest goes both ways. Not only is evidence informing how clinicians, occupational therapists, personal support workers and volunteers care for Baycrest clients, but researchers are also evaluating services to ensure high quality care and support.

Baycrest dementia arts therapyThe Road to Connection program is a great example of this. It’s an arts-based program that brings together caregivers and their partners with dementia for creative sessions and discussion. The program empowers dementia patients to tap into their creative skills while serving as a support group for caregivers.  On top of that, the program gives caregivers an opportunity to celebrate their partners through the art they have created and come away with a shared, meaningful experience.

“We could come back together at the end of the day with something for both of us,” said one caregiver participating in the program. “There aren’t many programs like this one that allow caregivers to meet and share without leaving loved ones behind.”

Baycrest researchers are evaluating the Road to Connection program with the hope of duplicating it across other sites within the Baycrest community and in Ontario.

Baycrest researchers have evaluated and helped redesign volunteer programs to improve resident engagement in Baycrest’s long-term care facility, the Apotex Centre. The Program for Leisure Engagement for Active and Spontaneous Experiences (PLEASE) is an evidence-based model that trains volunteers to work one-on-one and in small groups with residents, when they ask the simple question, “What do you want to do today?” The evaluation found that the PLEASE program enhanced the abilities and personhood of residents – more smiling, talking and engagement. Researchers are also exploring the use of volunteer visits to help older adults with dementia preserve or improve their thinking abilities.

This work helps long-term care homes incorporate cost-effective programs to improve care for residents with dementia and create new roles for volunteers working with older adults.

A century of excellence in complex care, research and training

The world’s population is aging rapidly, and Baycrest has the expertise to deliver proactive solutions. Now in its centennial year, Baycrest has spent 100 years pioneering the science of health and aging.

Baycrest provides compassionate, specialized care, conducts cutting-edge cognitive neuroscience research, commercializes innovative solutions, and trains the next generation of health care professionals with the skills needed to support and respond to the diverse and complex needs of older adults.

As a global leader, Baycrest’s work is contributing to a healthier, wealthier, and smarter future for Ontario and beyond.

 

Why does health research matter to us? We know that it generates new discoveries, better care, and greater efficiency all while contributing to our knowledge-based economy. That’s how it makes Ontario healthier, wealthier and smarter today. Investing in research hospitals will help us continue building a healthier, wealthier, smarter Ontario. Discover more health research and patient stories by signing up for our monthly newsletter or joining the #onHWS conversation on Twitter.

Group feature photo was taken during CAHO’s Healthier, Wealthier, Smarter Field Trip to Baycrest Health Sciences. Read our other Healthier, Wealthier, Smarter Field Trips here.

 

Research shows that preemie babies do better when families are involved in care

Dr. Karel O’Brien, with mother, Amy, whose twins were born at 23 weeks, 5 days.

An international study led by Sinai Health System researchers shows that a Family Integrated Care model of treating the tiniest and most fragile babies helps improve the wellbeing of both children and parents.

Neonatal intensive care units (NICU) in Canada, Australia and New Zealand adopted the Family Integrated Care model, developed at Mount Sinai Hospital by Dr. Shoo Lee, and found that it improved the wellbeing of both preemie babies and their parents compared to standard care:

  • Improved weight gain among preterm infants
  • Better breastfeeding
  • Reduced parental stress and anxiety

When Amy, a new mother of twins found herself in the Mount Sinai NICU with babies born at 23 weeks and 5 days, she felt scared and overwhelmed by how fragile the babies were. Still in the NICU after almost three months, she has found comfort in being part of the Family Integrated Care model. “It really allowed me to feel like a mother. Being with my babies all day, I know instinctively if something is wrong or what they need, and can report that to the doctors and nurses. They are getting stronger and stronger every day, and this model of care has made me believe that when I bring them home, I’ll be able to confidently care for them.”

The study was led by Mount Sinai Hospital researchers Dr. Karel O’Brien, neonatologist, and Dr. Shoo Lee, Chief of Pediatrics. Recently published in the prestigious journal, The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health, it involved nearly 1,800 infants born at 33 weeks gestation or earlier across 26 NICU units.

What is Family Integrated Care?

Family Integrated Care actively involves parents in the care of their newborns, including giving oral medicine, feeding, taking their temperate and taking part in ward rounds.

Mount Sinai supports parents in spending six hours a day, at least five days a week with their babies by providing them with a rest space and sleeping room, comfortable reclining chairs at the bedside and nurses trained in family support.

“Parents are too often perceived as visitors to the intensive care unit. Our findings challenge this approach and show the benefits to both infants and their families of incorporating parents as key members of the infant’s health care team, and helping parents to assume the role of primary caregiver as soon as possible,” says Dr. Karel O’Brien, who leads the Family Integrated Care Program at Mount Sinai.

Real impact for preemies and parents

“How care is provided to the family, not just the infant, has a positive effect on the wellbeing of both infant and family,” says Dr O’Brien. “Weight gain, breastfeeding and reduced parental stress and anxiety are all associated with positive neurodevelopmental outcomes, suggesting that integrating parents into the care of infants at this early stage could potentially have longer-term benefits.”

At 21 days, infants in the Family Integrated Care group had put on more weight and had higher average daily weight gain (26.7g vs 24.8g), compared to the standard care group. Additionally, parents in the Family Integrated Care group had lower levels of stress and anxiety, compared to the standard care group. Once discharged, mothers were more likely to breastfeed frequently (more than 6 feeds a day), compared to the standard care group (70% vs 63% ).There were no differences in rates of mortality, duration of oxygen therapy or hospital stay.

“The results of this trial are encouraging indeed. Not only is this an example of innovative care developed here in our hospital, it is an exceptional example of how a good idea can be shared across the country and around the world,” says Dr. Lee.  “This was truly a collaborative effort with participating NICU’s, parents, and the whole care team.”

Read more about this story in the media.

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Sinai Health System is one of Ontario’s 23 research hospitals that contribute to a healthier, wealthier, smarter province. Look for other RESEARCH SPOTLIGHT posts on our Healthier, Wealthier, Smarter blog or join the conversation about why health research matters for Ontario on Twitter, using the hashtag #onHWS.

The Next Generation of Top Research Talent

Ontario Research Hospitals make our province and our health system smarter by attracting, training and retaining the next generation of health care professionals. Carley Richards, a trainee at The Royal, shares her experience diving into mental health research.

Meet Carley Richards

Throughout her teenage years, Carley Richards struggled with feeling depressed.

It wasn’t until her second year of university that she was actually diagnosed with depression and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). She finally had a piece of paper, with a diagnosis, that proved it wasn’t just “in her head.”

It was a change that would have a huge impact on her academic career.

“The brain is like a big unknown body of water that we’re only just dipping our toes into,” says Richards. “I realized the more we learn about and understand the brain, the more we’ll be able to help people like me.”

The Gut and the Brain

Now working toward a master’s degree in neuroscience at Carleton University, Richards is a research trainee under the supervision of Dr. Marie-Claude Audet, a researcher at The Royal’s Institute of Mental Health Research (IMHR). She recently won a Graduate Student Research Award from the IMHR.

“Recent research has shown that people with depression have different bacteria in their digestive system than people without depression,” says Richards.

The goal of her research is to look at the microbiome of two different groups of people — those who have depressive symptoms and those who do not. She’s hoping to link trauma in a person’s life to changes in gut bacteria, and explore whether changes in gut bacteria are associated with depressive symptoms.

Life as a Young Researcher

“As a young researcher paying for my own education, I need funding to conduct my research, which means I need to apply for grants and scholarships,” she says.

“It can take a lot of time, and unfortunately for young researchers, there’s a lot of competition and rejection. It can be really tough to stay in research.”

The funding from the IMHR Graduate Student Research Award is helping Richards push her research project forward.

“When you’re stressed, your body releases certain chemicals,” she says. “I’m using this funding to purchase a lab kit that measures a specific binding agent that connects those stress chemicals to the bacteria in the gut.” By using this lab kit, it will be possible for Richards to measure those connections.

“We’re a long way from understanding the brain, but imagine if we could treat symptoms of depression by treating specific bacteria in your gut,” says Richards. “We’re not there yet, but it’s exciting to know I’m contributing to that possibility.”

The Graduate Student Research Awards are funded by The Royal’s Foundation. They fund research and education experiences for young researchers as they work to make a difference in the lives of people living with mental illness.

 

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The Royal Ottawa Health Care Group is one of Ontario’s 24 research hospitals that contribute to a healthier, wealthier, smarter province. Look for other RESEARCH SPOTLIGHT posts on our Healthier, Wealthier, Smarter blog or join the conversation about why health research matters for Ontario on Twitter, using the hashtag #onHWS.

Research Spotlight: Health Sciences North

Dr. Janet McElhaney and her team at Health Sciences North Research Institute (HSNRI) are working with Indigenous communities to promote healthy aging of Indigenous People in Canada.

On December 4th, 2017, MP Paul Lefebvre announced on behalf of Health Minister Ginette Petitpas Taylor and CIHR-IAPH, a $1.4 million funding investment for improving the health of Indigenous seniors.

This funding will support a project titled “Aging in Place: Promoting Healthy Aging for Indigenous People with Multiple Chronic Conditions”, led by HSNRI’S Dr. Janet McElhaney, Vice President of Research & Scientific Director and Dr. Jennifer Walker, Canada Research Chair of Indigenous Health at Laurentian University. Using Indigenous research methods, the project will explore caregiving experiences and patterns to better understand how communities can support Indigenous families living with multiple chronic conditions.

“The funding from CIHR will provide an opportunity for collaborative community-based research that will identify the needs of Indigenous older persons and develop interventions to address the health issues and barriers to care for older adults. It will allow us to work with communities and find innovative solutions while working to develop the next generation of researchers,” says Dr. Janet McElhaney, HSNRI’s Vice President of Research and Scientific Director.

This project is funded in partnership with First Nation communities in Northern Ontario and Saskatchewan to identify the needs of Indigenous older persons living with multi-morbidity; develop interventions to address health issues and barriers to caring for older adults; and evaluate the effectiveness of community-specific interventions to enhance “holistic health”.

The goal is to create a legacy of sustained partnerships that promote true reconciliation and together cultivate a way forward from colonization and intergenerational trauma to healthier aging.

 

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Health Sciences North is one of Ontario’s 23 research hospitals that contribute to a healthier, wealthier, smarter province. Look for other RESEARCH SPOTLIGHT posts on our Healthier, Wealthier, Smarter blog or join the conversation about why health research matters for Ontario on Twitter, using the hashtag #onHWS.

 

 

 

Hamilton Health Sciences: We Are Explorers

Redefining “Research”

By Ted Scott, Acting Vice President Research & Chief Innovation Officer, @Chief_Innovator 

The dictionary definition of “researcher” is painfully self-explanatory: “someone who conducts research.” Based on my experience at Hamilton Health Sciences over the last few years, this description does no justice.

The word “research” itself has attracted a certain connotation that invokes images of anonymous individuals in lab coats analyzing samples in whitewashed, sterile rooms in the pursuit of some far-off, seemingly impossible discovery. Sure, some discovery happens that way. But, so often, it’s so much more than that.

At HHS, our researchers are so much more than people in lab coats. They are innovative, strategic, highly creative minds who translate complex data into new knowledge. Many of our researchers are also healthcare providers. Every day, they work alongside the patients who are the inspiration for their research pursuits. Their “labs” are patients’ rooms, clinics, and operating theatres. Every day, they’re on the front lines of our healthcare system, asking questions and solving problems. Their roles span the entire spectrum of healthcare professions: they’re surgeons, pediatricians, physiotherapists, nurses, students. They’re also our neighbours, friends, family members and, sometimes, they’re patients, too.

In my short time at HHS, I’ve learned that our researchers are also some of our community’s top innovators and collaborators. They’re forming networks across our city and region that are aimed at improving the way we provide healthcare, applying technology and expertise to make our healthcare system better. And, most importantly, their work has immense, tangible impact. Beyond the lab and the computer database, our nearly 2,000 researchers and research staff are discovering and implementing new knowledge that’s changing the way we care for people, in real-time.

For example, they’re testing in-home technology that our nurses and doctors can use to monitor patients once they go home after heart surgery. They’re working with tech innovators to find better ways of predicting outcomes for cancer therapies, so patients can make better decisions around their treatment options. They’re trialling the latest therapies to help make life easier for kids with chronic diseases, like IBD.

This is just a sampling of the research happening at our hospitals, right now. It wouldn’t be possible without our researchers and research staff who are unwavering in their pursuit of making life better for people in our community, across our country, and around the world.

I admire their persistence, their patience, and their will to keep exploring, even when the answers aren’t clear. And especially when competing commitments – of being doctors, nurses, allied health professionals, students – are as demanding as they are in our very busy health system.

It’s this insatiable drive to know the unknown that I believe better defines a researcher, no matter how big or small the issue at hand.

At HHS, we’re redefining what “research” means to our community, and to the world.

We’re not just researchers. We are explorers. It’s in our DNA.

Read about Explorers at Hamilton Health Sciences:

BLOG: Creating a new treatment option

 

BLOG: The stubborn pursuit of “Why”

      

For more, visit WeAreExplorers.ca 

#WeAreExplorers #onHWS

 

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Hamilton Health Sciences is one of Ontario’s 23 research hospitals that contribute to a healthier, wealthier, smarter province. Look for other RESEARCH SPOTLIGHT posts on our Healthier, Wealthier, Smarter blog or join the conversation about why health research matters for Ontario on Twitter, using the hashtag #onHWS.

 

 

Canadian First: SickKids and Sinai Health System repair spina bifida in-utero

In a Canadian first, a team from Mount Sinai Hospital and The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) has repaired a form of spina bifida in a fetus at 25 weeks gestation. The baby’s mother, Romeila Son, recovered very well from surgery, and a bouncing baby girl, Eiko, weighing 2.45 kg, was born on August 19 at 36 weeks gestation at Mount Sinai Hospital. Since her birth, Eiko has needed no further intervention for this usually debilitating condition. This is the first case in Canada where the mother has not had to travel to the United States for this specialized surgery.

Dr. Greg Ryan heads Canada’s largest and most experienced fetal therapy program at Mount Sinai Hospital and Dr. James Drake heads Canada’s largest and most established neurosurgical centre for the postnatal repair of spina bifida at SickKids. Working in collaboration with colleagues from Vanderbilt University in Nashville who pioneered the procedure, a team of 24 clinicians led by Drs. Ryan and Drake successfully carried out the 2.5 hour in-utero procedure at Mount Sinai on June 4, 2017.


From left: Dr. Michael Apkon, President & Chief Executive Officer, SickKids; Dr. Paige Church, Head of spina bifida clinic at Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital; Dr. James Drake, Head of Neurosurgery, SickKids;  Premier of Ontario, Kathleen Wynne; Dr. Greg Ryan, Head of Fetal Medicine program, Mount Sinai Hospital; Romeo Crisostomo, Eiko’s dad; Romeila Son, Eiko’s mom; baby Eiko Crisostomo; Dr. Mathew Sermer, Obstetrician and Gynaecologist-in-Chief, Sinai Health System; Dr. Gary Newton, President and Chief Executive Officer, Sinai Health System.

What is spina bifida?

Myelomeningocele is a form of spina bifida, affecting approximately 120-150 babies in Canada each year. It is caused when the spinal column fails to close early in fetal development, causing permanent damage to the baby’s spinal cord and nervous system.

Babies with spina bifida can have varying degrees of paralysis of their lower limbs and many will need mobility supports such as leg braces, crutches or wheelchairs. Over 80 per cent of children with spina bifida will require a shunt to be inserted to relieve pressure on their brain, which must remain in place for their entire life, and some affected children will have a negative neurocognitive outcome. Between 15-30 per cent of children with spina bifida do not survive into adulthood and less than 50 per cent live independently as adults. A third of adults with spina bifida require substantial lifelong daily support. The emotional, social and financial impact for these affected individuals, their families and society as a whole, is enormous.

Better treatment option for babies

The Management of Myelomeningocele Study (MOMS), a groundbreaking trial published by Vanderbilt University, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and the University of California, San Francisco, in the New England Journal of Medicine in 2011, showed that, in babies who underwent the in-utero procedure:

  • Brain malformations were reversed by one-third
  • The need for walking aids or a wheelchair was halved
  • Their need for brain shunts was reduced by half

Consequently, the Society of Obstetrics and Gynaecologists of Canada (SOGC) now mandates that any pregnant woman whose fetus has spina bifida must be counselled about this treatment option.

“Although fetal surgery will not be appropriate for all fetuses with spina bifida, it is extremely encouraging that, for some, it may preserve neuromotor function, reverse brain herniation and reduce their need for a brain shunt,” said Dr. Greg Ryan, head of the fetal medicine program at Mount Sinai Hospital, part of the Frances Bloomberg Centre for Women’s and Infants’ Health. “However, it also entails some maternal and fetal risks, particularly that of premature labour, which must be carefully balanced.”

“We regularly see children who have been affected by spina bifida at SickKids,” said Dr. James Drake, head of the division of neurosurgery and senior associate scientist at SickKids. “It is my hope that our capacity to perform this in-utero surgery here in Toronto will mean that we can optimize their clinical outcomes, and reduce the degree of medical challenges these children will face.”

Collaboration counts

“I am extremely proud of the collaboration between Mount Sinai Hospital and SickKids – which has resulted in a terrific outcome for this baby girl,” said Dr. Ryan.”Having this kind of clinical capacity here in Ontario will really change the range of options available to parents who have been given a diagnosis of spina bifida during pregnancy.”

“I would like to congratulate everyone at Mount Sinai Hospital and SickKids who teamed up to perform Canada’s first in-utero spina bifida surgery,” said the Honourable Kathleen Wynne, Premier of Ontario. “The incredible story of baby Eiko’s journey into this world shines a bright light on our world-class health care professionals. They’re talented, innovative, and making life better for people in this province — starting even before they’re born. Congratulations to little Eiko and her family. I wish them a healthy, happy future.”

Mount Sinai Hospital and SickKids recently collaborated on another in-utero surgical first, repairing a congenital heart defect called transposition of the great arteries, in May, 2017. The team from SickKids and Mount Sinai Hospital is Canada’s only provider of fetal surgery.

Read the original press release of this Canadian First here.

*Feature photo: From left: Premier of Ontario, Kathleen Wynne; Dr. James Drake, Head of Neurosurgery, SickKids; Romeo Crisostomo, Eiko’s dad; baby Eiko Crisostomo; Romeila Son, Eiko’s mom; ; Dr. Greg Ryan, Head of Fetal Medicine program, Mount Sinai Hospital.

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SickKids and Sinai Health System are two of Ontario’s 23 research hospitals that contribute to a healthier, wealthier, smarter province. Look for other RESEARCH SPOTLIGHT posts on our Healthier, Wealthier, Smarter blog or join the conversation about why health research matters for Ontario on Twitter, using the hashtag #onHWS.

HIV care that’s made for women

Women are one of the fastest growing populations at risk for HIV infection and they have worse clinical outcomes than men do.

Dr. Mona Loutfy, a senior scientist at Women’s College Research Institute, is developing HIV care designed especially for women’s needs to close the health gaps they experience.

Dr. Loutfy leads the Canadian HIV Women’s Sexual and Reproductive Health Cohort Study (CHIWOS), a national study funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research. The study’s goal is to help women with HIV be as healthy as they can be in every way.

Study findings have shown that women in Canada receive good treatment for their HIV but their overall women’s health needs — including pregnancy planning, Pap testing, mammograms and mental health care — are often overlooked. To find and address these gaps, Dr. Loutfy engages women with HIV and their communities to ensure their concerns drive her research questions.

“When we set out to look at what we thought as researchers, were the most important topics, we thought it was going to be all about delivery of HIV care. What came out was actually a bit different.”

The study found that 64 per cent of the women had experienced violence in childhood and 80 per cent had experienced violence in adulthood. Half of the women had depressive symptoms. Isolation and poverty were also significant issues in the community.

“I feel that the care needs to be a little bit different,” Dr. Loutfy says.

She is working to create a new model of care that is women-centred, meaning focused on optimizing the overall health of women with HIV in Canada, particularly those at a higher risk, such as Indigenous women and trans women.

For women like Evana Ortigoza, a Community Advocate with Dr. Loutfy’s Trans Women HIV Research Initiative, the effort is very important. Evana is a trans woman who has lived with HIV for 17 years.

“The research they’re doing here is for trans and women, women with kids and women in all their diversity; it’s amazing. We are not alone,” she says. “Everywhere I go, Women’s College is there to make sure that women are protected.”

Watch the video above to learn more about Evana and Dr. Loutfy’s research, and visit report2017.womensresearch.ca to learn more about research at Women’s College Research Institute at Women’s College Hospital.

 

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Women’s College Hospital is one of Ontario’s 23 research hospitals that contribute to a healthier, wealthier, smarter province. Look for other RESEARCH SPOTLIGHT posts on our Healthier, Wealthier, Smarter blog or join the conversation about why health research matters for Ontario on Twitter, using the hashtag #onHWS.

Research Spotlight: North York General Hospital

Research Chairs Poised to Ask the Right Questions 

As a leading community academic hospital, North York General Hospital (NYGH) is uniquely positioned to transform and enhance patient care through continuous evolution. In 2011, the hospital released Strategy 2015-2018, which envisioned the achievement of excellence in integrated patient-centred care through learning, innovation and partnership. To achieve this stratagem, research and innovation plays a central role assuring the necessary evolution contributing to quality, efficiency and excellence in patient-centred care. The creation of the first-ever research chairs was a key part of building on the academic foundation.

“We know the majority of hospital care in Canada is provided in community hospitals, so the scholarly work we do will make a difference well beyond our catchment areas,” says Dr. Donna McRitchie, Vice President, Medical & Academic Affairs. “Our strategy for research and innovation is built around our research chairs, who will explore new ways to improve processes for delivering care.”

To date, North York General has recruited four research chairs, beginning with the recruitment of the Gordon F. Cheesbrough Research Chair in Family and Community Medicine, named after one of North York General’s greatest leaders and champions, and the first of its kind in Canada. The Chair’s purpose is to drive interdisciplinary, interprofessional and crossinstitutional research investigations, with the goal of enhancing the quality and outcomes of care provided at the individual and system level. Until recently the position was held by Dr. Frank Sullivan. NYGH is currently recruiting for the role.

Dr. Monika Kastner NYGK

Monika Kastner joined NYGH in February 2016 as the Research Chair in Knowledge Translation and Implementation. Knowledge translation is regarded as a bridge between the creation and implementation of knowledge and as such, it is highly relevant to NYGH strategic objectives.

“There is so much important work in health care research that is underutilized simply because we do not have adequate processes and channels for implementation and dissemination,” Monika says. “I’m interested in bridging that gap to help enhance the uptake of services and products for patients and families.”

North York General Hospital (NYGH) recently welcomed Patricia Trbovich

Patricia Trbovich joined the hospital in August 2016 as the Badeau Family Research Chair in Patient Safety and Quality Improvement. In her role, she focuses on reducing preventable medical errors and creating innovative solutions in a community academic hospital setting to enhance patient safety and quality of care.

“We have to proactively identify risks and mitigate them before they cause harm, as opposed to solely reacting once adverse events have already occurred,” Patricia says. “We have to embrace complexity and figure out where it’s needed and where we can reduce it.”

As the newest member recruited in August 2017, Katie Dainty, PhD, is the hospital’s Research Chair in Patient-Centred Outcomes. Katie is interested in finding new ways to enhance this experience by applying an often-ignored lens: the patient’s perspective.

NYGH Katie Dainty

“It’s important to remember that even if the care was clinically perfect, a patient’s life may be changed dramatically and they have to deal with after effects, both physically and psychologically,” Katie says. “The question is: what can we do leading up to, during and after hospital care to ensure there is the best possible long-term outcome for the patient and their family?”

The appointment of hospital research chairs is part of NYGH’s overall strategy to transform care through applied research and innovation. The hospital is immensely grateful to the North York General Foundation for their support in establishing these Research Chairs.

North York General Hospital is one of Ontario’s 23 research hospitals that contribute to a healthier, wealthier, smarter province. Read more Research Spotlight posts and other patient and researcher stories on our Healthier, Wealthier, Smarter blog or join the conversation about why health research matters for Ontario on Twitter, using the hashtag #onHWS.

 

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RESEARCH SPOTLIGHT: Hamilton Health Sciences

Hamilton researchers discover a simple blood test could save lives after surgery

Researchers at Hamilton Health Sciences’ Population Health Research Institute (PHRI) and McMaster University have determined that a simple blood test can predict and possibly prevent many of the deaths that occur after surgery.

“If death after surgery within the first 30 days was made its own category of death, it would be in the top 5 leading causes of death within North America,” explained Dr. P.J. Devereaux, principal investigator for the “VISION” study.

The VISION study enrolled nearly 22,000 patients aged 45 years or older from 23 hospitals in 13 countries and found that approximately 18 per cent of them sustained heart damage within 30 days of non-cardiac surgery and that, without enhanced monitoring, the vast majority – as many as 93 per cent – of these complications will go undetected, potentially until it’s too late to intervene.

Putting pressure on the heart

“The effects of surgery anywhere in the body create a perfect milieu for damage to heart tissue, including bleeding, blood clot formation, and long periods of inflammation,” says Dr. Devereaux, scientific leader of perioperative medicine at PHRI, director, division of cardiology at McMaster University. “In most cases, this damage occurs within the first 24 to 36 hours after surgery when patients usually receive narcotic painkillers that can mask symptoms of cardiac distress.”

“These discoveries have the potential to save lives.”

After surgery, study patients had a blood test for a protein called high-sensitivity troponin T, which is released into the bloodstream when injury to the heart occurs. Devereaux and his team discovered that patients with troponin T levels beyond a certain threshold had increased risk of death within 30 days of having surgery.

Overall, the study found that 1.4 per cent of patients died within 30 days following non-cardiac surgery.

“One per cent seems like a small number, until you consider that about 200 million surgeries are performed each year around the world,” says Devereaux. “Where we’re letting patients down is in post-operative management. We now know that we need to become more involved in care and monitoring after surgery to ensure that patients at risk have the best chance for a good recovery. These discoveries have the potential to save lives.”

The results of the VISION study were published in The Journal of the American Medical Association.

 

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Hamilton Health Sciences is one of Ontario’s 23 research hospitals that contribute to a healthier, wealthier, smarter province. Read more Research Spotlight posts on our Healthier, Wealthier, Smarter blog or join the conversation about why health research matters for Ontario on Twitter, using the hashtag #onHWS.