Published by cahoadmin at January 12, 2018

Patients + Research: Pamela Parker

Patients + Research is a platform for patients to discuss their relationship and experience with the research that leads to new cures, cares and treatments.

Research and care at Canada’s first cardio-rheumatology clinic

Meet Pamela

Two years ago, Pamela Parker’s hands became cracked and sore, and she learned she had developed severe psoriasis and eczema.

Pamela Parker Women's College Hospital

After seeing a specialist, she learned the psoriasis was also in her joints, a condition known as psoriatic arthritis. She was referred to Dr. Lihi Eder, a rheumatologist and a scientist at Women’s College Hospital (WCH) who runs the psoriatic arthritis program at WCH. After sharing her family’s history of heart disease, Dr. Eder referred Pamela to the WCH cardio-rheumatology clinic, the first of its kind in Canada.

Research has shown that patients with rheumatic conditions, such as psoriatic arthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, are at a higher risk for heart disease and other cardiovascular complications. The new clinic is helping patients like Pamela manage their heart health, and ideally, prevent a serious cardiac event. Dr. Eder and Dr. Paula Harvey, the head of cardiology at WCH, jointly run the clinic and collaborate on research studies about the connections between joint health and heart health.

Pamela shared why she is grateful for her care and why she gives back by participating in research.

Could you tell us about your health story?

All of a sudden, it was May 2015, when my skin just went berserk and my joints just went berserk. I was getting married as well, and you are focused on your nails and hands. I thought — why would my hands go from normal to this, and my joints? That’s when I was referred to Dr. Eder. She is very thorough and very caring. She actually takes her time out of her day to call me personally, which does not usually happen with specialists. I found out I do have psoriatic arthritis on top of psoriasis and eczema. She said we need to treat this aggressively or I could end up being crippled.

How were you referred to the cardio-rheumatology clinic?

Dr. Eder said there was a correlation between psoriatic arthritis and heart disease. She asked if I had a family history. I do, my father passed away of a massive coronary and my sister has had a triple bypass. I was referred to the cardio-rheumatology clinic and they did tests, and I have elevated cholesterol, nothing major at this point. For me, it was so amazing to have access to a cardiologist at a stage where if there is an issue they will be on top of it, knowing my family history. Dr. Eder then asked if I wanted to join a combined study and I was happy to participate in their research.

Why did you decide to participate in research?

It is so important. Participating is minor compared to having a crippling disease that no one knows anything about. My kids, my grandkids, my great grandkids could end up with these conditions, and if studies could figure out the ins and outs and shortcuts to detect issues early, I am all for it!


Approximately 30% of the people with psoriasis will develop an inflammatory arthritis known as psoriatic arthritis. Learn more about the psoriatic arthritis rapid access clinic at Women’s College Hospital and discover patient resources.


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