Published by cahoadmin at August 17, 2017

Patients + Research: Joan Baillie

Patients + Research is a platform for patients to discuss their relationship and experience with the research that leads to new cures, cares and treatments.

Meet Joan

Three years ago, Joan Baillie was diagnosed with Mild Cognitive Impairment (a condition that is likely to develop into dementia). She participated in a brain rehabilitation research study at Baycrest Health Sciences led by Rotman Research Institute senior scientist, Dr. Brian Levine, and learned strategies to improve focus and complete everyday tasks through his Goal Management Training intervention. Since her diagnosis, Joan continues to function well and enjoy life.

Joan Baillie Baycrest Research Toronto

Can you tell us a bit about yourself and your health story?

More than 20 years ago, I had a mini stroke (also known as a Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA), a condition when the brain’s blood flow is temporarily blocked) and made a full recovery. After I left my car running with the keys inside for two hours, I visited my family doctor about memory concerns. My doctor diagnosed me with Mild Cognitive Impairment and while researching the condition, I read that it could lead to dementia.

A year after my diagnosis, I saw an advertisement about a research study taking place at Baycrest. They were looking for people who experienced a mini stroke or TIA and could benefit from cognitive rehabilitation. I was accepted into the study which would help doctors learn more about the brain and the cognitive changes that may occur with a stroke or mini strokes. The hope is that this will help doctors learn how to best treat those with cognitive problems. This research helped me better understand my memory problems and handle changes that are taking place in my brain.

Short-term memory loss always remains a concern and I am very aware of the signs of dementia.

Why does health research matter to you?

The more the doctors know, the more they can do for you. It’s important that doctors have more knowledge because we are an aging population that is living longer.

The brain scans taken at the start of the study showed that I might have experienced many mini strokes which potentially led to my memory loss. With Dr. Brian Levine’s Goal Management Training, I learned many strategies to help with focus and memory and these allow me to live my life more productively.

How does health research contribute to a healthier Ontario?

I believe without health research we would still be contracting polio, dying from diabetes and not living our lives fully due to brain limitations. Every advance in medicine is the result of research. If research can help find a reliable treatment for those suffering from dementia and/or Alzheimer’s, or even help everyone live their lives to the fullest, then it is absolutely necessary for this research to take place.

The knowledge that is gained from health research will contribute to the future care and treatment of patients with similar problems. It will help medical professionals look after their patients in more productive and understanding ways. It will ultimately save the government many dollars as they will better understand what is needed to serve people who live with dementia or similar conditions. We are approaching a crisis stage because hospitals, nursing homes and the general public are struggling to accommodate those who are living with these diseases.

How can patients and families support, improve or empower health research?

The public should understand that it research is necessary if there is going to be any improvement in the care of people in the future. People should make themselves available for research in any area for which they are experiencing issues. It takes some of your time, but the results will benefit so many patients with dementia or Alzheimer’s. When I told people I was involved in a research study, they congratulated me for doing something positive. We can all do that by sharing our experiences and encouraging other people to become involved in research projects.

 

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Add Your Voice

Want to add your voice to the Patients + Research blog series? Email or call Elise Bradt at ebradt@caho-hospitals.com, 416-205-1469, or direct message or tweet at us on Twitter at @CAHOhospitals.

Read more Patients + Research posts and share your own insights on Twitter with the hashtag #onHWS. To learn more about how health research makes Ontario healthier, wealthier and smarter, visit our impact page, and check out our other blog posts and videos.