Celebrating Science and Innovation across CAHO Hospitals

On October 25th, the Council of Academic Hospitals of Ontario (CAHO) held its 3rd Healthier, Wealthier, Smarter Health Research Showcase at Queen’s Park to demonstrate and celebrate the breadth and depth of health research underway across Ontario’s 23 research hospitals.

“Today’s slogan is that health research makes Ontario healthier, wealthier and smarter. I believe that’s true, but I would add that health research also gives us the opportunity to be better,” said Bill Bishop, who spoke at our showcase about his experience participating in a metabolic syndrome research study with Dr. Amer Johri at Kingston Health Science Centre. Read more about that research in a previous blog post.


Bill Bishop, metabolic syndrome research volunteer from Kingston Health Sciences Centre, shares his experience and thoughts on the value of research for Ontario.  

“Investing and participating in health research is not an opportunity to give back, but an opportunity to give forward, to future generations,” Bill continued. “It often happens that, while doing the research on one specific thing, new and different things are discovered. By investing and participating in research, we are better citizens.”

An inspiring morning, our showcase welcomed nearly 30 Ministers, MPPs, Government Officials and Queen’s Park staff into a room full of science and innovation to meet the amazing researchers who make it happen.

“It really takes a special kind of person to do research,” said CAHO Chair, Kevin Smith. “Today we celebrate not only the product, but the people. In partnership with our University and College partners, research-intensive hospitals are here to help scientists drive research that really matters to the people of Ontario, Canada and the world.”


Dr. Martin Osmond, Vice President of Research at Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO), tests out Botley’s Bootle Blast, a mixed reality rehabilitation therapy game developed by researchers at Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital.  


Our showcase was a meeting of the minds – literally! Researchers at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre are using focused ultrasound technology to open the blood-brain barrier in people with Alzheimer’s disease to get therapies safely and directly into the brain.


Can we generate a kidney for human transplant by replacing cells in a pig’s kidney with a patient’s own cells? Dr. Ian Rogers and Tonya Bongolan from Sinai Health System share their research with Minister Reza Moridi. 

Part of the celebration also included remarks from Minister of Research, Science and Innovation, Reza Moridi, who has been a strong champion of health research in Ontario. Minister Moridi described how some cancer diagnoses that would likely have been fatal 25 years ago are treatable today and, in some cases, are even curable thanks to discovery and the dedication of researchers. This is the real impact that health research has on the daily lives of people in this province.


Minister Reza Moridi speaks to the audience at CAHO’s 3rd Healthier, Wealthier, Smarter Health Research Showcase 

The showcase was buzzing with over 100 representatives from CAHO member hospitals in the room, and over 230 voices engaging on our #onHWS hashtag, which trended at number one in Canada throughout the morning.

DOWNLOAD the summary of research on display.

SCROLL through our live tweet summary.

LEARN more about CAHO hospitals.

Read more blog posts on our Healthier, Wealthier, Smarter site and share your insights on Twitter with the hashtag, #onHWS. To learn more about how health research makes Ontario healthier, wealthier, and smarter, check out our website and our other blog posts and videos.

*Feature Photo: Drs. Gianluigi Bisleri and Ben Glover form Kingston Health Sciences Centre showcase their innovative 3D cardiac ablation procedure – a Canadian first.

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Health and Community Leaders Talk: Ted Scott

For this Health and Community Leaders Talk blog post, we’re focusing on the value of Ontario’s Innovation Brokers. Supported by a task force of executive leaders from across Ontario’s research hospitals, the Council of Academic Hospitals of Ontario (CAHO) began its work as an Innovation Broker in April 2017, in partnership with the Ontario Chief Health Innovation Strategist (OCHIS).

CAHO’s Innovation Broker task force is co-chaired by Ted Scott, Acting Vice President Research & Chief Innovation Officer at Hamilton Health Sciences. We sat down with Ted to get his take on why the Innovation Broker work is important, and how it makes Ontario healthier, wealthier and smarter.

What inspired you to be involved with CAHO’s work as an Innovation Broker?

In my role as Chief Innovation Officer at Hamilton Health Sciences (HHS), I am helping to create a culture of collaboration and working to connect our clinical experts and scientists to high potential digital health companies to develop innovative clinical care models. My work at HHS is really well aligned to the Innovation Broker mandate and I’m excited to help make it easier for companies to get their innovations into Ontario’s research hospitals. At the end of the day, this will improve care and make our health system more efficient for our patients.

What’s in it for innovators?

The CAHO Innovation Broker work provides new opportunities for companies and research hospitals to work together to develop solutions and drive innovation adoption across the province. It also provides companies with stronger and more meaningful feedback on their innovations, allowing them to iterate and develop more relevant and marketable products.

At a larger scale, CAHO’s Innovation Broker work is helping to grow a culture of innovation within Ontario’s research hospitals and developing better processes to pull innovations into our organizations. We know that one of the toughest barriers companies face on the long path to market is connecting with those early adopters who are willing to test-drive innovations that will lead to better care. Through our Innovation Broker role, companies only have to knock on one door to gain access to Ontario’s 23 research hospitals, making those first connections a lot faster and easier.

Our hope is that this not only makes it easier for innovators to partner with us today, but that we’re building a better system and better partnerships to improve innovation adoption long into the future.

How can Ontario’s Innovation Broker work help fuel a healthier, wealthier, smarter province?

The Innovation Broker work is really about re-thinking how we deliver healthcare. By providing a streamlined and transparent process for connecting healthcare providers and innovative companies, we will be able to do a better job of providing care and drive economic growth at the same time. Collectively, Ontario’s Innovation Brokers are working to deliver a healthcare system powered by our world-leading research community in collaboration with our most promising industry partners. A more innovative health system is definitely a future we can all work towards.

  • Visit the CAHO website to learn more about our Innovation Broker work and how you can be involved.
  • Visit the OCHIS website to learn more about Ontario’s Innovation Brokers.

 

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Read more Health and Community Leaders Talk blog posts on our Healthier, Wealthier, Smarter site and share your insights on Twitter with the hashtag, #onHWS. To learn more about how health research makes Ontario healthier, wealthier, and smarter, check out our website and our other blog posts and videos.

Research Spotlight: North York General Hospital

Research Chairs Poised to Ask the Right Questions 

As a leading community academic hospital, North York General Hospital (NYGH) is uniquely positioned to transform and enhance patient care through continuous evolution. In 2011, the hospital released Strategy 2015-2018, which envisioned the achievement of excellence in integrated patient-centred care through learning, innovation and partnership. To achieve this stratagem, research and innovation plays a central role assuring the necessary evolution contributing to quality, efficiency and excellence in patient-centred care. The creation of the first-ever research chairs was a key part of building on the academic foundation.

“We know the majority of hospital care in Canada is provided in community hospitals, so the scholarly work we do will make a difference well beyond our catchment areas,” says Dr. Donna McRitchie, Vice President, Medical & Academic Affairs. “Our strategy for research and innovation is built around our research chairs, who will explore new ways to improve processes for delivering care.”

To date, North York General has recruited four research chairs, beginning with the recruitment of the Gordon F. Cheesbrough Research Chair in Family and Community Medicine, named after one of North York General’s greatest leaders and champions, and the first of its kind in Canada. The Chair’s purpose is to drive interdisciplinary, interprofessional and crossinstitutional research investigations, with the goal of enhancing the quality and outcomes of care provided at the individual and system level. Until recently the position was held by Dr. Frank Sullivan. NYGH is currently recruiting for the role.

Dr. Monika Kastner NYGK

Monika Kastner joined NYGH in February 2016 as the Research Chair in Knowledge Translation and Implementation. Knowledge translation is regarded as a bridge between the creation and implementation of knowledge and as such, it is highly relevant to NYGH strategic objectives.

“There is so much important work in health care research that is underutilized simply because we do not have adequate processes and channels for implementation and dissemination,” Monika says. “I’m interested in bridging that gap to help enhance the uptake of services and products for patients and families.”

North York General Hospital (NYGH) recently welcomed Patricia Trbovich

Patricia Trbovich joined the hospital in August 2016 as the Badeau Family Research Chair in Patient Safety and Quality Improvement. In her role, she focuses on reducing preventable medical errors and creating innovative solutions in a community academic hospital setting to enhance patient safety and quality of care.

“We have to proactively identify risks and mitigate them before they cause harm, as opposed to solely reacting once adverse events have already occurred,” Patricia says. “We have to embrace complexity and figure out where it’s needed and where we can reduce it.”

As the newest member recruited in August 2017, Katie Dainty, PhD, is the hospital’s Research Chair in Patient-Centred Outcomes. Katie is interested in finding new ways to enhance this experience by applying an often-ignored lens: the patient’s perspective.

NYGH Katie Dainty

“It’s important to remember that even if the care was clinically perfect, a patient’s life may be changed dramatically and they have to deal with after effects, both physically and psychologically,” Katie says. “The question is: what can we do leading up to, during and after hospital care to ensure there is the best possible long-term outcome for the patient and their family?”

The appointment of hospital research chairs is part of NYGH’s overall strategy to transform care through applied research and innovation. The hospital is immensely grateful to the North York General Foundation for their support in establishing these Research Chairs.

North York General Hospital is one of Ontario’s 23 research hospitals that contribute to a healthier, wealthier, smarter province. Read more Research Spotlight posts and other patient and researcher stories on our Healthier, Wealthier, Smarter blog or join the conversation about why health research matters for Ontario on Twitter, using the hashtag #onHWS.

 

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